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Posts Tagged ‘vitamin B6’

Puritan’s Pride Vitamin D3, 5-HTP, and $5 Off Coupon

September 15th, 2009 1 comment

If you’re taking advantage of the buy 1 get 2 free sale at Puritan’s Pride and buying $25 or more of products, enter the coupon code 200903 during your checkout to get another $5. That’s enough to cover the standard $4.95 shipping amount with a nickel to spare. The coupon code is claimed to last until September 30, 2009, but the buy 1 get 2 free sales is over September 19, 2009.

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Puritan’s Pride carries a huge variety of dietary supplements, vitamins, amino acids, skin care formulas, and other products for your well-being. Some of our favorite Puritan’s Pride products useful to a lot of people are their Vitamin D3 5000 IU softgels and 5-HTP 100mg mood and sleep aid capsules.
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N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) Reduces Hair Pulling Compulsion and May Also Be Useful for OCD

August 4th, 2009 2 comments

(NOTE: Updated some of the products and vendors mentioned on July 25, 2010.)

N-Acetylcysteine is an inexpensive and highly absorbable form of the amino acid cysteine which has numerous health benefits. Previously, I’ve mentioned NAC for use as a preventive measure against the common cold and flu infections (see Preventive Measures for Swine Flu), to help prevent liver damage from Tylenol (see Health Risks from Tylenol, Acetaminophen, and Paracetamol), and to detoxify your body of the mercury in dental fillings, predatory fish, and high fructose corn syrup (see High Fructose Corn Syrup is Dangerous for Many Reasons).

NAC Also Useful in Mental Health

It turns out that NAC also has uses in mental health and psychiatry, too. There is now clinical trial evidence that it can be used to treat trichotillomania, an impulse control disorder involving pulling the hair out of one’s head, eyelashes, eyebrows, or elsewhere on the body. This disorder affects somewhere between 1% and 5% of the world’s population and is strongly female predominant. Estimates are that 70% to 93% of trichotillomania patients are female. There is a belief that the disorder may have genetic origin, but so far the related genes found don’t explain all cases of the disorder.
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